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Reverse-Grip Bent-Over Barbell Row


Reverse-grip bent-over barbell rows

Target:
Lower lats.

Best In Workout:
Because you are so much stronger during this move and because it is a bent-over move that taxes the lower back to a great extent, perform this early in your training.

Sets & Reps:
Perform 4 sets with 6-12 reps

Stance:
Standing with your feet shoulder-width apart, grasp a barbell with an underhand, shoulder-width grip. A firm solid, foundation will help you get the most out of the row. The reverse grip will automatically allow you to be stronger (than the overhand-grip version) because you are engaging your biceps.

Bent Knees:
Keeping your knees slightly bent, lean forward at your waist until your torso is roughly parallel with the floor. You want to have a little “give” in your knees throughout the set. Slightly opening and closing the angle of your knees will allow a follow-through movement on each rep while also alleviating your lower back from undue stress.

Barbell:
The barbell should hang straight down and very close to the front of your shins. Without raising your upper body, pull the barbell up toward your lower abdomen, bringing your elbows high and ubove the level of your back. You can actually drag the bar up the quads to your lower abs. By dragging the bar, you are sure to fully engage those lower-lat fibres with better accuracy because it will keep your arms in line with the sides of your body.

At The Top:
Hold the bar in the peak-contracted position for a brief count then slowly lower the along the same path. When the bar is near your abdomen, your elbows should actually be behind the plane of your back. It is at that point that you can squeeze your lower lats with incredible intensity. Try holding that point for up to 2 seconds before lowering the bar to full-arm extension.

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Is It Necessary To Use A Weight Belt When Training? I Hear It Can Actually Limit How Much Strength You Gain In Your Lower Back


Belts are viewed as more of a necessity, simply because your lower back is crucial to everything else you do. There are a lot of people who believe that by wearing a belt, you are limiting your lower back development, and that is true to some extent. But just like with straps, if your lower back is out of shape and you are a bodybuilder, you will want to offer it some additional training exercises with back extensions or lighter deadlifts to make sure the area gets the attention it needs. You are only as strong as your weakest link. Do not leave your belt in the bag because you think it makes you less of a lifter, though. It can be the tool that helps you train safer and for longer than guys who choose not to wear one.


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Balanced Training Recommendations


1) Perform an equal number of exercises with the same relative intensity between opposing muscle groups (eg, back and chest, hamstrings and quads, biceps and triceps). If you already have a deficit, try to do more sets on the weaker/disregarded bodyaprt until you have achieved better balance. Then train bodyparts equally.
2) To bring your training into balance, focus on isolation (single-joint) exercises while also modifying the compound movements that target the various muscle groups. For example some exercises, such as the squat and leg press, are generally regarded as quadriceps moves, even though they absolutely involve the hamstrings and glutes. However, by altering foot placement (wider, higher on platforms etc.) you can shift the emphasis to the less involved hamstrings.
3) If you have an existing deficit between opposing muscle groups, spend some extra time stretching the stronger muscle group and strengthening the weaker one.
4) If you find a specific bodypart to be particularly stubborn at responding to an adequate training stimulus, consider adding an extra day (or two) specifically dedicated to working the stubborn bodypart until it catches on.


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Angle Pairings for Optimal Pre-exhaustion


Here is a list of the bodyparts and the first (isolation move) and second exercise (compound move).

Legs – Leg extension and Squat
Lying Leg Curl and Leg Press
Back – Decline Pullover and Close-grip Pulldown
Shoulders – Cable Lateral Raise and Overhead Press
Triceps – Pressdown and Bench Dip
Chest – Cable Crossover and Decline Bench Press
Biceps – Dumbbell Curl and Chin-up (underhand grip)

The biceps is generally not thought to have a compound exercise, although the chin-up is as close to being a multi-joint movement for the biceps as possible.

https://veefitness.wordpress.com/2013/11/14/pre-exhaust-training/


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Barbell Hack Squat


Barbell Hack Squat

Targets:
Quads, hamstrings, glutes primarily. Back secondarily.

Best in Workout:
Perform the barbell squat early in your workout. As it is a full-body move, it is best done with heavy weight,. Also it is tough on the lower back, so you want to be fresh as possible on each set.

Sets & Reps:
Performs 3-4 sets with 6-12 reps.

Stance:
Space your feet shoulder-width apart and firmly plant them on the floor, then drop into a squat position. You need a firm foundation and it starts with your feet. If you are new to this move, or deadlift-type exercises in general, you might notice that your heels tend to rise off the floor at the start. Work to keep your feet flat, this will get easier as you warm-up and become more accustomed to the move.

Arms:
With your arms fully extended, grasp the bar using a pronated grip just outside your legs, locking your thumbs around the bar. This position should resemble the start of a deadlift, only with the bar behind you. Many people make the mistake of trying to use their arms to pull the bar up. If you bend your arms in an attempt to raise the bar, you won’t be as nearly as strong as you could be. Your arms should act as hooks, attaching yourself to the bar.

Breathe:
Inhale deeply, holding your breath as you begin the move. You want to hold your breath at the start of the move. Not only are you stronger when you do so, but it will also increase your intra-abdominal pressure and stabilise your spine while protecting you from injury. As you begin the descent towards the start (bottom) of the move you will also naturally and necessarily hold your breath.

Legs:
Drive through your heels, extending your hips and knees simultaneously until you are standing erect with the bar, exhaling at the top of the motion. At this point, the bar should be just under your glutes. The barbell hack squat is very similar to the deadlift, in that it is a pressing move for the legs. Again, if you try and pull the weight up with your upper body without concentrating on the legs, you will defeat the purpose of this exercise, not to mention risk injury. Remember to squeeze the quads, hams and glutes at the top as you catch your breath. Use pulling straps, since the amount of weight you can press with your legs will probably exceed how much weight you can hold in your hands.