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One-Arm Low (Or High) Cable Crossover


One-Arm Cable Crossover

Targets:
Pecs, with emphasis on the upper and middle chest fibres.

Best In Workout:
You can use this move as a pre-exhaust exercise preceding the compound presses necessary for mass, or you can put this last in your workout to flush and pump the muscle full of water, blood and nutrients.

Sets & Reps:
Perform 3-4 sets with 15-20 reps

D-Handle:
Grasp a D-handle attached to the low cable and place your non-working hand on the same-side hip. Similar to the single-arm overhead press, using only one side of the body will help engage and recruit more stabiliser activity than you typically experience. As your core fatigues, you can hold the opposite handle in the non-working hand, helping you anchor and balance yourself.

Stance:
Place your feet slightly wider than shoulder-width apart and tighten your abs. Standing halfway between the two low cables with a wide stance provides a stable foundation.

Slight Bend:
Stand up straight and keep your working arm slightly bent. You should work to keep that slight bend in your elbow fixed throughout the entire set. Doing so will help focus the attention on the chest fibres. If you open and close the bend in your arm, you will lessen the effectiveness and shift some of the focus off the chest and onto your arm.

Range Of Motion:
Pull the handle up and across your body. Bring the handle all the way across so that at the end of the range of motion, the handle is in front if the opposite shoulder. During the typical cable crossover, the handles meet in front of your chest or face, but working one side at a time allows you to cross your body, engaging more pec fibres for a longer ROM before returning to the start position and repeating.


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Standing One-Arm Overhead Press


Standing One-arm Overhead Press

Targets:
All delt heads, with emphasis on front and middle heads.

Best In Workout:
Great as one of your first exercises, not only as it is a compound movement move for delts, but it also brings your stabilisers into play, and you want those fresh. You can also precede this move with front and lateral raises if you want to pre-exhaust the detls. However, if you do so, your weight selection will be drastically reduced.

Sets & Reps:
Perform 3-4 sets with 8-12 reps.

Dumbbell:
Stand holding a dumbbell at shoulder level. Do not worry about holding a dumbbell at a 90 degree angle at the start, just ensure your elbow is pointing down at the start, with the dumbbell just above your shoulder.

Opposite Hand:
Your non-working hand should be on the same-side hip. By not holding on to a stable post with your opposite hand, you automatically call upon your core musculature to a higher degree and this will cause you to be stronger in every aspect of your training. As you fatigue,, holding onto a stable post like a power rack or Smith machine is fine and can allow you to bust out a few more reps.

Stance:
With your feet slightly wider than shoulder-width apart and your abs tight, press the dumbbell straight over-head to full-arm extension. You can vary how far apart your feet are, but having a wide, solid base will help you during the move and also alleviate lower-back stress. Be sure to keep your knees unlocked and your legs fixed. Many athletes think they are stronger on the seated version, but actually if your lower back and core are fit, you are capable of lifting more weight overhead from a standing position.

You do not have to be “perfect” throughout each rep. In other words, your upper body does not have to remain perfectly straight. Go ahead and allow a bit of a dip in your shoulder as you lower and press the dumbbell overhead. This will happen naturally, especially since you are using a heavy weight.


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Straight-Arm Pulldown Vs Decline Cable Pullover


Both are great for isolating the lower lats but which is better because of its increased range of motion and time under tension.

Straight-Arm Pulldown
A classic exercise, the straight-arm pulldown is a great pre-exhaust movement for lats or as a finisher at the end of a brutal back workout. It completely isolates the lats while also calling into play the core musculature. You have probably felt your deep abdominals hard at work during a gruelling set of these pulldowns, and that is absolutely critical and expected. The exercise requires considerable stabiliser activity, especially the heavier you go. If you are stopping the bar on the upward phase when your arms approach parallel, your lats and core are under extreme tension. Many athletes allow the bar to travel too high, causing a loss of tension in the lats. The two keys for this exercise are to hold the peak contraction for a count at the bottom with the bar directly in your line of sight, and pulling it all the way into your body at the bottom of the rep as you squeeze your lats.

Decline Cable Pullover
This lower lat exercise takes a little trial and error in terms of bench placement. You have to place the bench far enough away from the stack to allow your arms full extension at the start of the rep without letting the plates touch down. You might have to do a couple of trial reps to ensure you are set up correctly. Unlike the straight-arm pulldown, the decline pullover requires minimla stabiliser activity. If you are thinking the pullover is a chest move, you are correct, but it is even more so when performed in an incline or flat position. The decline pullover is an excellent lat exercise whose key is a shoulder-width grip and completely straight arms throughout the movement. Opening and closing the angle of the elbows will automatically involve triceps and chest.

The Winner: Decline Cable Pullover
Even though your head is lower than your legs, with the cable gravity does not diminish the effectiveness of the exercise as you pull the bar into your lower body, therefore your alts remain involved longer. Because the bar travels closer to your legs, you can squeeze your lats as you would during the straight-arm pulldown. However, the angle of your body causes the lats to be engaged through a greater range of motion. In contrast to the straight-arm pulldown, which requires you to stop the bar to keep tension, the decline cable allows you to reach back overhead while maintaining that necessary tension in the lats. The fact that you do not have to worry about balance makes the decline cable pullover the clear winner in the race towards building incredible lower lats.


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Best Alternative Exercsies to Prone Incline Rear Delt Cable Raise


Reverse Pec-Deck Flye
On the pec-deck you can isolate the rear delts with similar success. If you do the one-arm version, wrap your non-working arm around the bench to further anchor yourself, so that you can target the rear delt precisely. You can also go from one arm to the other side more easily as you obviously do not have to move the bench around. However, whereas during the cable version constant tension on the rear delt is easy to maintain, a common mistake during the reverse pec-deck flye is to allow the weights to touch down at the start, so keep an inch or so of space between the plates on each new rep.

One-arm Bent-over Cable Lateral Raise
Removing the bench automatically incorporates your core musculature into the equation. The mechanics of the exercise remain the same as you keep your arm slightly bent and do one arm at a time. Opening and closing the angle of your elbow will immediately involve your triceps and remove the emphasis from your rear delt. Your upper body does not have to be perfectly parallel to the floor, but avoid excessive up and down movement of your torso. As always, resist the urge to crane your neck to watch yourself in the mirror as this practice will prove unsafe for your cervical spine.


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Diet Destroyers


Sports and energy drinks have become very popular among many sports athletes and gym-goers, but if you don’t limit consumption of these drinks you will pack on extra calories your body doesn’t need, especially on your midsection. Research suggests that your body requires only water during moderate exercise less than 60 minutes. Recommendations from the National Athletic Trainers’ Association include drinking 7-10 ounces of water during exercise, or sipping on a sports drink every 10-20 minutes during, long intense training sessions. Otherwise you should consider staying away from high-calorie energy drinks altogether. To burn off one 200 calorie Monster Energy drink, a 185 pound man would have to vigorously train with weights for 25 minutes. If you are attempting to get lean or ripped, stick with water.