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Smith-Machine Drag Curl


Targets:
Biceps, with emphasis on the longer (outer) head or “peak”.

Best In Workout:
You can placed the frag curl anywhere in your training repertoire, just as long as you precede or follow it woth moves that hit the short, inner head as well as your forearms.

Sets & Reps:
Perform 3-4 sets with 12-15 reps

It’s A Drag:
Stand holding a bar in front of your upper thighs, with your chest up, shoulders back and eyes focused forward. Begin the move by pulling your elbows back as you raise the bar toward your upper abs/lower chest. With the drag curl, you are forced to eliminate as much deltoid involvement as possible. This means you want to keep your elbows back and pull your elbows behind you as you drag the bar up your abdomen., which is why the range of motion is so limited.

Range Of Motion:
The bar should not come any higher than your upper abs. If it does, it means you are allowing your elbows to travel too far forward., engaging more delts than desired. Make sure those elbows move backward not forward.

No Balance Required:
Because you are using the Smith-machine, you do not have to worry about balancing the bar. Therefore, you can probably lift more weight than you would typically lift with the free-weight version. Do not be afraid to overload the muscles.


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Arm Work-out


Arms

Here is a workout which focuses on the arms. This workout will leave you with a pump.

Biceps
Concentration Curls – 5-6 sets, 12 reps
Wide-Grip Barbell Curls – 5 sets, 12 reps
Hammer Curls – 5 sets, 12 reps
Standing Bent-Over Concentration Curls – 5 sets, 12 reps.

Triceps
One-Arm Overhead Extension – 5-6 sets, 12 reps
Pressdown – 5 sets, 12 reps
One-Arm Pressdown – 5 sets, 12 reps
Rope Pressdown – 5 sets, 12-15 reps


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Wide-Grip Standing Barbell Curl


Wide-grip standing barbell curl

1) Stand up with your torso upright while holding a barbell at the wide outer handle. The palm of your hands should be facing forward. The elbows should be close to the torso. This will be your starting position.
2) While holding the upper arms stationary, curl the weights forward while contracting the biceps as you breathe out.
Tip: Only the forearms should move.
3) Continue the movement until your biceps are fully contracted and the bar is at shoulder level. Hold the contracted position for a second and squeeze the biceps hard.
4) Slowly begin to bring the bar back to starting position as your breathe in.
5) Repeat for repetitions.

Variations:
1) You can also perform this movement using an EZ-bar or EZ-attachment hooked to a low pulley. This variation seems to really provide a good contraction at the top of the movement.
2) You may also use the closer grip for variety purposes.


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Standing Bent-Over Concentration Curls


1) Stand with feet in a wide staggered stance (one foot out in form of the other).
2) Bend at the waist keeping your back straight. You body should be leaning forwards and to the side that you are not lifting the dumbbell with (foot that is forward).
3) Keep your abs tight and head aligned with the spine, hold a dumbbell in your hand. Keep your arm hanging down with the other arm rested on top of your knee for added support.
4) Curl the dumbbell in a smooth arc to the top and then slowly return it to full-arm extension. Ensure that the elbow is positioned at the same point throughout the curl.


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Hammer Curls


Hammer Curls
Dumbbell hammer curls is an auxiliary arm exercise that primarily develops the bicep brachii (bicep) and forearm (brachioradialis). With the hammer curl, your get more forearm involvement.

1) Stand erect holding a dumbbell in each hand, to your side. Ensure palms are facing inwards and arms are straight.
2) With elbows to your sides, raise one dumbbell until the forearm is vertical and the thumb is facing your shoulder.
3) Lower to the original position and repeat with alternative arm.

The biceps may be exercised alternating (as described), simultaneous, or in simultaneous-alternating fashion. When elbows are fully flexed, they can travel forward slightly allowing forearms to be no more than vertical. This additional movement allows for relative release of tension in muscles between repetitions.