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Incline Barbell Front Raise


Target:
Front delts

Best In Workout:
Perfect as a finishing move for the front delt, following the bigger, compound exercises such as overhead presses or upright rows.

Sets & Reps:
Perform 3 sets with 15-20 reps.

Set The Incline:
Sit on an incline bench set to about 45 degree angle. The range of motion during this exercise is very small, but setting the bench at the right angle will help better target the front delts longer within the range of motion. Any less or more of a bench angle and the delts will definitely lose tension at either the lower or upper portion of the move.

Grip:
Hold a barbell with an overhand (pronated) grip about shoulder-width apart. To start the move, raise the barbell a few inches above your quads, keeping your arms straight as possible. The “start” of this moves feels as though you are right in the middle or the end of the exercise because raise the barbell off the quads takes a lot of effort, so start off light. You will quickly realise you do not need a lot of weight on this isolation move to elicit results. Many of you may have tried the version of this version in which you face the incline bench, however, the supine version does not allow the lower traps to assist in the execution.

At The Top:
Raise the bar up over the face until your arms are just short of perpendicular to the floor. If you raise the barbell too high, your arms will reach a straight up-and-down angle to the floor, which all but release any tension on the front delts. A point of reference might be to stop the bar when it is in direct line with your line of sight.

Constant Tension:
Squeeze your delts hard, then lower the bar under control to a point just above your quads without letting it touch legs. By stopping short of touching your quads, you automatically force your delts to continue working. Only after you fatigue should you allow the weight to momentarily touch.

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Standing One-Arm Overhead Press


Standing One-arm Overhead Press

Targets:
All delt heads, with emphasis on front and middle heads.

Best In Workout:
Great as one of your first exercises, not only as it is a compound movement move for delts, but it also brings your stabilisers into play, and you want those fresh. You can also precede this move with front and lateral raises if you want to pre-exhaust the detls. However, if you do so, your weight selection will be drastically reduced.

Sets & Reps:
Perform 3-4 sets with 8-12 reps.

Dumbbell:
Stand holding a dumbbell at shoulder level. Do not worry about holding a dumbbell at a 90 degree angle at the start, just ensure your elbow is pointing down at the start, with the dumbbell just above your shoulder.

Opposite Hand:
Your non-working hand should be on the same-side hip. By not holding on to a stable post with your opposite hand, you automatically call upon your core musculature to a higher degree and this will cause you to be stronger in every aspect of your training. As you fatigue,, holding onto a stable post like a power rack or Smith machine is fine and can allow you to bust out a few more reps.

Stance:
With your feet slightly wider than shoulder-width apart and your abs tight, press the dumbbell straight over-head to full-arm extension. You can vary how far apart your feet are, but having a wide, solid base will help you during the move and also alleviate lower-back stress. Be sure to keep your knees unlocked and your legs fixed. Many athletes think they are stronger on the seated version, but actually if your lower back and core are fit, you are capable of lifting more weight overhead from a standing position.

You do not have to be “perfect” throughout each rep. In other words, your upper body does not have to remain perfectly straight. Go ahead and allow a bit of a dip in your shoulder as you lower and press the dumbbell overhead. This will happen naturally, especially since you are using a heavy weight.