VeeFitness

Bringing you the latest in health and fitness


Leave a comment

Garlic Goodness


Garlic provides numerous health and physique benefits. Not only does it enhance heart health, but research shows that it aids fat burning, can help to lower the catabolic hormone cortisol, and concomitantly raise testosterone levels. Recent research suggests that garlic can actually boost nitric oxide levels (NO).

Researchers from the university of Adelaide (Australia) gave 50 patients with treated but uncontrolled high blood pressure wither a garlic supplement containing 960 milligrams of aged garlic or a placebo everyday for 12 weeks. They measured the subjects’ blood pressure at the start and every four weeks thereafter. The researchers reported in a 2010 issue of the journal Maturitas that the group supplementing with the garlic had a drop in pressure which was on average 10mm hg (pressure units) lower than in the placebo group. The scientists concluded that this was likely to be due to garlic’s ability to boost NO levels, which relaxes blood vessels and causes a reduction in blood pressure. This relaxation in the blood vessels also increases blood flow to the muscles, which is critical for energy and for producing a muscle pump during workouts, as well as aiding recovery and muscle growth.

The researchers suggested that cooked garlic would not be as effective as a garlic supplement because heat destroys the active ingredient, allicin. So go with garlic supplements and take about 200-1000mg with your pre-workout shake. To maintain higher NO levels throughout the day, also consider taking a dose in the morning and late at night.

Advertisements


Leave a comment

High Fructose Intake Beneficial In Athletes


High-fructose corn syrup is the principal sweetening agent in most high-sugar soft drinks. Fructose provides the sweet taste in fruits. In sedentary people, it is linked to an increased risk of the metabolic syndrome (abdominal obesity, abnormal blood fats, high blood pressure, poor blood sugar regulation, inflammation and blood-clotting abnormalities). People consume about 300 more calories per day more than they did 30 years ago, largely because of an increased intake of fructose. A report published in Current Sports Medicine Reports, stated that a high fructose intake was beneficial for athletes. Fructose stimulates the digestion and promotes carbohydrate used during exercise, which are important for optimal performance. Intense training involves high energy expenditure, which protects athletes from the negative effects of fructose experienced by sedentary people.


2 Comments

Green Tea Cuts Fat and Prevents Free Radical Damage


Green tea is a popular weight loss supplement. A controlled study published in the Journal of American College Nutrition, reported that green tea or green tea extract supplements reduced body fat and prevented oxidative cell damage in obese people with the metabolic syndrome (eg. high blood pressure, abdominal fat deposition, insulin resistance, abnormal blood fats). People lost an average of 5.5lb of fat and reduced BMI (Body Mass Index, measure of the proportion of weight to height) by 1.9 points. Green tea (4 cups per day) or green tea extract (2 tablets per day) improved metabolic health in obese people.


Leave a comment

Ab Fat Linked To Alzheimer’s Disease


Abdominal fat deposition is a sign of poor metabolic heath. It is an important symptom of the Metabolic Syndrome that includes insulin resistance, abnormal blood fats, high blood pressure, any type II diabetes. Researchers from Boston University School of Medicine found that midlife abdominal obesity increased the risk of dementia. CT scans of the abdomen and brains of 733 older adults (average age of 60) showed that those with more abdominal fat had the greatest rates of brain deterioration.


Leave a comment

Neck Circumference Is a Good Predictor of Health Problems


A good measure of obesity is hard to find. Sophisticated measurements such as DEXA (dual energy X-ray absorptiometry), air displacement, and underwater weighing, are expensive and largely unavailable. Body mass index (BMI; the proportion of weight to height) is the most common measure of fatness, but it is inaccurate in weight-trained athletes. Waist circumference is difficult for most people to measure. Researchers from the University of Michigan found that neck circumference was related to excess body fat and was a reliable predicator of obesity in children. Neck circumference was a good screening tool in children for predicting future adult health problems, such as obstructive sleep apnea, diabetes and high blood pressure.