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Incline Barbell Front Raise


Target:
Front delts

Best In Workout:
Perfect as a finishing move for the front delt, following the bigger, compound exercises such as overhead presses or upright rows.

Sets & Reps:
Perform 3 sets with 15-20 reps.

Set The Incline:
Sit on an incline bench set to about 45 degree angle. The range of motion during this exercise is very small, but setting the bench at the right angle will help better target the front delts longer within the range of motion. Any less or more of a bench angle and the delts will definitely lose tension at either the lower or upper portion of the move.

Grip:
Hold a barbell with an overhand (pronated) grip about shoulder-width apart. To start the move, raise the barbell a few inches above your quads, keeping your arms straight as possible. The “start” of this moves feels as though you are right in the middle or the end of the exercise because raise the barbell off the quads takes a lot of effort, so start off light. You will quickly realise you do not need a lot of weight on this isolation move to elicit results. Many of you may have tried the version of this version in which you face the incline bench, however, the supine version does not allow the lower traps to assist in the execution.

At The Top:
Raise the bar up over the face until your arms are just short of perpendicular to the floor. If you raise the barbell too high, your arms will reach a straight up-and-down angle to the floor, which all but release any tension on the front delts. A point of reference might be to stop the bar when it is in direct line with your line of sight.

Constant Tension:
Squeeze your delts hard, then lower the bar under control to a point just above your quads without letting it touch legs. By stopping short of touching your quads, you automatically force your delts to continue working. Only after you fatigue should you allow the weight to momentarily touch.

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Standing One-Arm Overhead Press


Standing One-arm Overhead Press

Targets:
All delt heads, with emphasis on front and middle heads.

Best In Workout:
Great as one of your first exercises, not only as it is a compound movement move for delts, but it also brings your stabilisers into play, and you want those fresh. You can also precede this move with front and lateral raises if you want to pre-exhaust the detls. However, if you do so, your weight selection will be drastically reduced.

Sets & Reps:
Perform 3-4 sets with 8-12 reps.

Dumbbell:
Stand holding a dumbbell at shoulder level. Do not worry about holding a dumbbell at a 90 degree angle at the start, just ensure your elbow is pointing down at the start, with the dumbbell just above your shoulder.

Opposite Hand:
Your non-working hand should be on the same-side hip. By not holding on to a stable post with your opposite hand, you automatically call upon your core musculature to a higher degree and this will cause you to be stronger in every aspect of your training. As you fatigue,, holding onto a stable post like a power rack or Smith machine is fine and can allow you to bust out a few more reps.

Stance:
With your feet slightly wider than shoulder-width apart and your abs tight, press the dumbbell straight over-head to full-arm extension. You can vary how far apart your feet are, but having a wide, solid base will help you during the move and also alleviate lower-back stress. Be sure to keep your knees unlocked and your legs fixed. Many athletes think they are stronger on the seated version, but actually if your lower back and core are fit, you are capable of lifting more weight overhead from a standing position.

You do not have to be “perfect” throughout each rep. In other words, your upper body does not have to remain perfectly straight. Go ahead and allow a bit of a dip in your shoulder as you lower and press the dumbbell overhead. This will happen naturally, especially since you are using a heavy weight.


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Static King


One of the best ways to improve your strength is by moving nothing at all.

If your goal is strength, putting a zero-movement strategy into your repertoire could be exactly what you need.

By way a review, a static contraction, also known as an isometric, is one which the muscular force equals the external resistance, producing no movement whatsoever. For example, you loaded up the barbell on the bench press with much more than your 1RM (one rep max) and began pressing against it with all your might, you would have a static contraction. Even if the bar didn’t budge, despite the lack of movement a ton of muscular activity would be going on inside the muscle.

Research confirms you can produce more force and strength statically than you can during positive contractions. How can this benefit you in terms of strength? You need to look no further than your nearest sticking point. A static-training plan can help you blast past those sticking points that usually act as roadblocks. The good news is that you can apply the technique to just about any exercise from the squats to overhead press even to bicep curls. Be warned, though: it is more difficult than it looks. Applying continual maximal effort without movement is brutal and effective.

Be Specific
One key factor to keep in mind is that, although strength increases are associated with static training, they are angle specific. When you train statically at a particular angle, you gain strength and size only at that angle. Take for instance the overhead press. If you worked statically at one particular point along the path of the ROM, you would gain strength there and nowhere else. The gain in strength is not necessarily distributed along the entire range of motion. For this reason, you need to apply static training at various places.

The Weak Link
So where do you start? Go straight to the weakest point of your range of motion, which is near the bottom of most exercises. If you are working on the bench press, set the safety bars to the sticking point and load up the bar. Forget about it being your “weakest point” and be sure to load more weight than you could normally move so that you are certain to have absolutely no movement. If you are working out at peak gym hours or you do not feel comfortable putting that much weight on the bar, you can work with and empty bar, but from underneath the safeties. Simply press the bar up into the safeties as hard as possible.

A couple of items to note: On your pressing movements be very careful not al allow your hands to slip. Using chalk during static training is a good idea, because if your hands slip, your wrists can sustain severe injury, second, for the pulling movements throw on some pulling straps to make sure your pulls are not hindered by your grip strength. If you do not wear straps, use chalk instead.

Adding a static day a couple of times a month into your routine across all bodyparts will help trigger serious strength gains. The better able you are to blast through sticking points, the more weight you will ultimately move during standard weight training sessions.


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Angle Pairings for Optimal Pre-exhaustion


Here is a list of the bodyparts and the first (isolation move) and second exercise (compound move).

Legs – Leg extension and Squat
Lying Leg Curl and Leg Press
Back – Decline Pullover and Close-grip Pulldown
Shoulders – Cable Lateral Raise and Overhead Press
Triceps – Pressdown and Bench Dip
Chest – Cable Crossover and Decline Bench Press
Biceps – Dumbbell Curl and Chin-up (underhand grip)

The biceps is generally not thought to have a compound exercise, although the chin-up is as close to being a multi-joint movement for the biceps as possible.

https://veefitness.wordpress.com/2013/11/14/pre-exhaust-training/


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Stay Grounded For Building Strength


Exercising on stable ground builds core stability and increases lower and upper body strength. No study has been able to prove that exercising on unstable surfaces improves athletic performance or builds significant strength in major muscle groups better than training on firm ground. I study in the International Journal of Sports Physiology Performance reported that stable squatting was superior to unstable squatting for overloading the lower-body muscles. The best total-body strength exercises include kettlebell swings and snatches, squats, deadlifts, standing overhead presses any plyometrics. These exercises use heavier loads, shorter tension times, and higher speeds than exercises on unstable surfaces. Ground-based exercises have the same force, velocity and core-stabilising elements required in most sports and movements skills. The take-home message is to stay grounded for strong muscles.