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Incline Barbell Front Raise


Target:
Front delts

Best In Workout:
Perfect as a finishing move for the front delt, following the bigger, compound exercises such as overhead presses or upright rows.

Sets & Reps:
Perform 3 sets with 15-20 reps.

Set The Incline:
Sit on an incline bench set to about 45 degree angle. The range of motion during this exercise is very small, but setting the bench at the right angle will help better target the front delts longer within the range of motion. Any less or more of a bench angle and the delts will definitely lose tension at either the lower or upper portion of the move.

Grip:
Hold a barbell with an overhand (pronated) grip about shoulder-width apart. To start the move, raise the barbell a few inches above your quads, keeping your arms straight as possible. The “start” of this moves feels as though you are right in the middle or the end of the exercise because raise the barbell off the quads takes a lot of effort, so start off light. You will quickly realise you do not need a lot of weight on this isolation move to elicit results. Many of you may have tried the version of this version in which you face the incline bench, however, the supine version does not allow the lower traps to assist in the execution.

At The Top:
Raise the bar up over the face until your arms are just short of perpendicular to the floor. If you raise the barbell too high, your arms will reach a straight up-and-down angle to the floor, which all but release any tension on the front delts. A point of reference might be to stop the bar when it is in direct line with your line of sight.

Constant Tension:
Squeeze your delts hard, then lower the bar under control to a point just above your quads without letting it touch legs. By stopping short of touching your quads, you automatically force your delts to continue working. Only after you fatigue should you allow the weight to momentarily touch.


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Beach Bummed


Competitive bodybuilders usually train for symmetry and proportion in an effort to build an aesthetically pleasing physique. There are many individuals who go to the gym to build up their beach muscles, disregarding symmetry and proportion in designing their training programs. Instead of training opposing muscle groups equally, they sometimes ignore the muscles they cannot see (back, hamstrings, calves, quads) and focus on the muscles they admire in the mirror everyday (chest, biceps, shoulders and abs). Although training specific muscle groups more than others can create an unbalanced-looking physique, disregarding a muscle group over time can potentially lead to other problems that may subject the body to injury.

One common mistake with regard to balanced training is performing an unbalanced training program between the chest and back muscles. The amount of time, energy, effort, volume and frequency between the agonist chest muscles and the antagonists back muscles may not be equal, or even close. A simple example would be an athlete who performs 4 sets os four exercises for the chest (for a total number of 16 sets) and does only 3 sets of three exercises for the back (for a total number of 9 working sets). Following this unbalanced training regime over time will result in back muscles much weaker than the chest muscles. This imbalance may lead to a slightly kyphotic posture (forward/rounded shoulders) that can potentially cause shoulder problems because of the faulty posture. In addition to the stronger chest muscles (compared to the back muscles) pullong the shoulders forward, inadequate stretching of the chest musculature can further contribute to this problem.

For some people, training legs consists of quads and that is it. The disregard their hamstrings while training only the quadriceps. Exercises such as the leg extensions, hack squats and front squats place a large amount of emphasis on the quads. Although these exercises are great you need to do an equal amount of hamstring work with leg curls and romanian deadlifts to stress both muscle groups. Distributing attention evenly to both muscle groups can give you healthier knees and lower back, as well as fewer hamstring strains because of an unbalanced hamstring-to-quad strength ration.

A less obvious training error woth regard to balanced training concerns the shoulders. Overhead shoulder press, incline bench press, flat bench press and other chest and shoulder pressing movements are critical for maximal muscle development. However, these exercises focus on the major muscle groups such as the deltoids, pectoralis major, pectoralis minor and other muscles known as prime movers. Often ignored in a training regime is the training or isolation of the smaller muscle groups in the shoulder known as the rotator cuff (the supraspinatus, infraspinatus, teres minor and subscapularis) that are critical in keeping the upper arm in the socket of the shoulder. Failure to train these smaller muscles groups, two of which are not even visible can create an imbalance between the large prime movers and small stabilisers. This lack of imbalance in strength may result in bursts of bursitis, tendinitis or even rotator cuff tears in the shoulder joint.


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Shoulder Workout


Shoulder muscles

Here is a workout which focuses on the shoulders:
(Standing or Seated) Overhead Dumbbell Press – 3 sets, 7-8 reps
(Standing or Seated) Dumbbell Lateral Raise – 3 sets, 10-12 reps
Alternating Front Dumbbell Raise – 3 sets, 10-12 reps
(Standing or Seated) Bent-over Lateral Raise – 3 sets, 10-12 reps
Dumbbell Shrug – 3 sets, 12-15 reps


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Bent-Over Lateral Raise


bentover lateral raise– With a dumbbell in each hand and your chest up, back flat and knees slightly bent, bend over at the waist until your torso is just above parallel with the floor.
– Let the dumbbells hang directly beneath you with your arms locked in a slightly bent position.
– Without rising up and keeping your arms bent, powerfully raise the dumbbells up and out to your sides until your upper arms are about parallel with the torso.
– Slowly lower the dumbbells back to the start position and repeat.


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Standing Overhead Barbell Press


Standing Overhead Barbell Press Taking it out of a power rack or picking it off the floor and carefully cleaning it to shoulder level, stand erect holding a loaded barbell at shoulder level with a grip well outside your shoulders.
– In a smooth, strong motion, press the bar straight up to just short of elbow lockout.
– Squeeze, then lower the bar under control to the start and repeat for reps.