VeeFitness

Bringing you the latest in health and fitness


Leave a comment

Not Eating Enough Fibre


Fibre is probably the least thought of nutrient in bodybuilding, yet it is extremely helpful and beneficial to you as a dieting bodybuilder to keep things moving along smoothly and to help your body digest all that extra protein in your diet. This ensures that you get the proper absorption of nutrients from all the food when you are eating six to eight meals a day. If sufficient fibre is not consumed, your body can become toxic and in some extreme cases you can have impactment, which would require medical attention. The best way to get adequate fibre is a combination of fibre supplements along with fibrous vegetables. Fibre also helps to keep you more satiated.

Advertisements


Leave a comment

Slow Roasted Root Vegetables


Easy to make and a low calorie filling side dish.

Preparation: 1hour and 45 minutes
Serves: 8 servings
Energy: 88 calories per serving

Ingredients:
– 1 tbsp sage
– 1 tsp thyme
– 1 tsp rosemary
– 2 cups beets
– 2 cups chopped carrots
– 2 cups cauliflower
– 2 cups slices parsnips
-1 medium red potato
– 2 cups cubed turnip

Method:
1) Pre-heat the over to 315°F (150°C).
2) Peel the beets, turnips, carrots and parsnips.
3) Cut the beets, turnips and potatoes into quarters. Then cut similarly sized pieces of carrot, parsnips and cauliflower.
4) Place all the veggies in a large roasting pan. Season with salt and pepper and add fresh herbs.
5) Roast at 315°F covered in aluminium foil for 30 minutes. Stir vegetables.
6) Cook another 30 minutes. Stir vegetables again.
7) Place back in the oven, uncovered this time checking every 10 minutes until done (should be fork tender).
8) Let cool and serve.


Leave a comment

Constantly Hungry Since Starting Training?


I’m finding that, since I started training, I’m constantly hungry. Why is that? Should I worry?

That hunger is normal, and it is a good sign. Training boosts your metabolism, so when you start training, you should feel much hungrier than you did before. Feed that appetite. Your body needs the extra calories, and if you expect to grow, you should eat. Naturally, if you fulfil your cravings with foods high in salt, sugar or unhealthy fats, you are not doing yourself and favours. Eat clean foods and your starving muscles will respond with growth.

If your goal is to lose weight, here are some ways to help you avoid feeling hungry without over indulging and hopefully lose weight in the process.

Get lots of healthy, high-fibre foods in your diet. Most high-fibre foods require more chewing, which helps to satisfy hunger. High-fibre foods are usually bulky so they fill up your stomach faster and can also delay the time it takes your stomach to empty. Also, many high-fibre foods are low in calories, so you can satisfy your hunger with fewer calories. Whole grains, vegetables and fruits are great sources of fibre.

Spread out your calories by eating five to six small meals as opposed to three large ones during the day. If you wait too long for a large meal, you will be starving and tempted to overindulge by the time you eat. Eating more frequent, smaller meals helps keep you full and lets you stay in control.

Slow down when you are eating. It takes our body about 20 minutes to realise that it is full. If you eat quickly, you will consume extra calories while your body is figuring out whether it’s hungry. By the time your body realises it is full, you have already eaten more than you needed. If you eat slowly, your brain will start sending signals to stop eating at the right time. This is another reason to spread your calories out during the day – you won’t be starving when it is time to eat, so you will take your time eating.


2 Comments

Preventing Loss of Muscle Mass And Strength


Something for the relatively older folks on here (young folks could equally benefit)

5 tips on how to prevent loss of muscle mass and associated strength with age:

1) Exercise, specifically resistance training. Both men and women. The deeper I delve into this subject and whenever I look at research, the more the importance of weight training is confirmed.
2) Opt for at least 1kg/kg of bodyweight of protein intake per day. That’s 0.5gr/lb.
3) Get adequate vitamin D, either from sunlight or supplemented if you’re lacking from exposure to the sun. I can’t recommend the importance of vitamin D enough.
4) Balance intake of acid-producing nutrients with alkalising fruits and vegetables. This is something often overlooked yet I incorporate this in virtually every single one of my meals.
5) Emerging evidence suggests adequate vitamin B12 and folic acid intake to improve muscle function too.


4 Comments

Antioxidants


Without antioxidants, many of us would be prey to numerous infections and possibly even cancer within a few months. Although our bodies produce their own antioxidants, we also need to boost our defences by eating foods that contain them. Just how important these dietary antioxidants are is a matter of great debate. All too often claims for dietary antioxidants, particularly for supplements, have been exaggerated, but recent research suggests that they may offer protection against certain cancers and heart disease, and may also help to prevent premature ageing.

Antioxidants protect against free radicals, chemicals which are formed in the body as part of its metabolism and defence against bacteria. Certain factors, such as excessive exposure to environmental pollution or ultraviolet light, illness and cigarette smoke, can cause the body to increase its production of free radicals. Left unchecked, these unstable and potentially harmful chemicals create conditions that may precipitate heart disease and cancer. To cope with these free radicals, the body needs more antioxidants than it can produce, particulary during times of illness or when exposed to pollutants. Fortunately, many foods provide antioxidants that help to protect the body against their threat.

Vitamins E and C and beta carotene, the plant form of vitamin A, help to neutralise free radicals, as do minerals such as selenium, (found in shellfish and avocados), copper (in nuts, seeds and shellfish) and zinc (in shellfish). Bioflavonoids, found in some fruit and vegetables, including citrus fruits, and grapes, also have antioxidant properties. Artificial antioxidants are added to margarine and oils to stop them becoming rancid, and to retain the natural colourings of processed foods.

Preventing Disease

More research is needed into the role of antioxidants in disease prevention. However, it is thought that free radicals may start the damage that causes fatty cholesterol deposits in the arteries, which can eventually lead to heart disease or stroke. High levels of antioxidant vitamins and minerals may help to prevent this harmful process, as well as damage to DNA that could lead to certain cancers.

Supplements of particular antioxidant vitamins or minerals need to be taken in the correct balance and, even then, too many can be harmful. To obtain an adequate intake of antioxidants, it is safer to eat plenty of fresh fruit and vegetables. Citrus fruit provides vitamin C, and brightly coloured fruit and vegetables supply beta carotene. The vitamin E found in nuts, avocados and vegetable oils may also help to protect against disease.